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(no subject) [Aug. 1st, 2005|01:08 pm]
Converts United
cottonjane
Hi fellow converts,

I joined a while back but never introduced myself. First I was an Atheist, then I was a quasi-Hindu, then I was Agnostic and then I was Protestant and now I'm Catholic. I'm looking forward to getting to know you guys better.

Take care,
Joanna
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(no subject) [Jul. 22nd, 2005|02:04 am]
Converts United

giveawayboy
[music |klaus nomi]

Just wanted to poke my head in and say Hello. I'm a convert from Methodism to Catholicism. But I love hearing the various reasons people have for converting and also the psychological or intellectual journeys they take in this process, which really opens up their souls. It's pretty fascinating to witness conversions. I think that is why I love novels and films. They show this process in people.

Yours, Bill
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I'm baaaack [Jul. 19th, 2005|11:01 am]
Converts United

j00licious
[mood |calmcalm]
[music |"closer to fine" - indigo girls]

Actually, I've been back since Saturday. I'm glad the place is still standing =P

We have a new member! Say hello to sugarandbrine. ^_^


PLEEEEEAAAAASSSEEEE read my last post and respond to my queries. Fanks.

luv
~j00licious
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(no subject) [Jul. 11th, 2005|11:11 pm]
Converts United

dehaywardati
[mood |gratefulyo!]
[music |Mimamakim--Idan Raichel Project]

Shalom y’all,

Suppose I should introduce myself considering the mod already offered a nice hello.

My name is Natalie, I’m 20-ys-o and from the San Francisco Bay Area. I am about to enter my third year at Hendrix College in Arkansas where I am double majoring in Spanish and International Relations & Global Studies, Latin America. I’m looking forward to spending next year studying abroad in Argentina and getting to know the other members aquí. I decided this post was already long enough that I'll post my religious trek some other time.

But now for my first contribution:
What do you like more about your new religion?Collapse )
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administriva [Jul. 11th, 2005|08:25 am]
Converts United

j00licious
[mood |chipperchipper]
[music |"Hope" - REM]

Welcome new members madamerahil and dehaywardati! Membership is now at 16-- not hugely mind-bogglingly stellar, but a whole heck of a lot better than I ever expected. ^^

Couple of questions:

Do we want to have a community icon? If we decide we do, how would you like to go about choosing one?

How can we make the community better? --What kinds of discussions would you like to see happen, do we want to do anything like recipe exchanges, etc etc?

zeriel and I are getting married on Thursday, so I might not get to check back here until next week. Until then, don't burn the place down while I'm gone. =P

~j00licious
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So, what was your journey? [Jun. 28th, 2005|10:12 am]
Converts United

shaysdays
[mood |cheerfulcheerful]
[music |Peekaboo noises from children]

What do you like more about your new religion?
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(no subject) [Jun. 24th, 2005|11:10 pm]
Converts United

mcsokrates
Family issues seem to be a theme of late, so I'll share my little mini-history.

My father comes from a long line of conservative midwest Lutherans. Think Lake Wobegon and you're on the right track. My mother was not raised as religious, but in college became part of the Charismatic movement, which my father also became a part of. So my religious upbringing was a mixture of more staid mainline Protestantism and Charismatic Pentacostal worship. By the time I was in middle school, both parts of my early religious life had become expressly politicized, just at the moment when I was forming my own political ideology (my original flirtation with Anarchism turned into a more pragmatic Libertarian Socialism with a brief detour in doctrinaire Marxist-land.) I tried, for some time, to reconcile my politics to my faith. I eventually found that there was no contradiction between the two, but there was between the Church body I was raised in and my politics. I put this off and tried to live with it for some time. During this time though, I began studying and thinking through my faith in a more explicit fashion. Increasingly I found myself wondering if my birth Church had not gotten things thoroughly wrong. I found myself believing even more strongly in the message of Christ (forgiveness in personal relations, radical non-violence, living simply, the essential equality of all humanity, rejection of materialism, etc.) But found that, in the tradition I was raised in, this message is oftentimes replaced by a reverence for the person of Jesus. (not that such reverence is bad, per se, but if one ignores His teachings, how much does it mean?)

So, pressured by both personal conscience and my own ideology (which, incidentally, had become throughly intertwined with my faith by this point) I began to search for another path within Christianity that would work for me. I eventually settled upon Quakerism, and am currently in the process of converting (becoming convinced in Quaker parlance.)

My parents have been accepting of my choice, even if they do not understand Quakerism. (Their sticking point is the non-hierarchical nature of the Religious Society of Friends. For me this is a selling point, not one of contention. So it goes.) This I chalk up largely to their involvement in an ecumenical movement.Family issues seem to be a theme of late, so I'll share my little mini-history.

My father comes from a long line of conservative midwest Lutherans. Think Lake Wobegon and you're on the right track. My mother was not raised as religious, but in college became part of the Charismatic movement, which my father also became a part of. So my religious upbringing was a mixture of more staid mainline Protestantism and Charismatic Pentacostal worship. By the time I was in middle school, both parts of my early religious life had become expressly politicized, just at the moment when I was forming my own political ideology (my original flirtation with Anarchism turned into a more pragmatic Libertarian Socialism with a brief detour in doctrinaire Marxist-land.) I tried, for some time, to reconcile my politics to my faith. I eventually found that there was no contradiction between the two, but there was between the Church body I was raised in and my politics. I put this off and tried to live with it for some time. During this time though, I began studying and thinking through my faith in a more explicit fashion. Increasingly I found myself wondering if my birth Church had not gotten things thoroughly wrong. I found myself believing even more strongly in the message of Christ (forgiveness in personal relations, radical non-violence, living simply, the essential equality of all humanity, rejection of materialism, etc.) But found that, in the tradition I was raised in, this message is oftentimes replaced by a reverence for the person of Jesus. (not that such reverence is bad, per se, but if one ignores His teachings, how much does it mean?)

So, pressured by both personal conscience and my own ideology (which, incidentally, had become throughly intertwined with my faith by this point) I began to search for another path within Christianity that would work for me. I eventually settled upon Quakerism, and am currently in the process of converting (becoming convinced in Quaker parlance.)

My parents have been accepting of my choice, even if they do not understand Quakerism. (Their sticking point is the non-hierarchical nature of the Religious Society of Friends. For me this is a selling point, not one of contention. So it goes.) This I chalk up largely to their involvement in an ecumenical movement.
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"It's just a phase!" [Jun. 24th, 2005|09:34 pm]
Converts United

shaysdays
[mood |annoyedannoyed]
[music |Snoring doggie]

Alright, so I went from being raised Lutheran, to getting involved with a very strict Baptist church, to looking into Judiasm, to getting convinced into being a Quaker. (Hi, kibbles!) It was an interesting journey, and I've learned a lot from all my experiences.

However, I've been going to Meeting now for over five years- and rather, pardon the pun, religiously at that. *Rolls eyes at own self* However, I still get things like, "Oh, I guess Shay is a Quaker now, isn't that right, Shay?" and "Well, when you decide to come back to church we'll save you a seat!" or worst of all, just flat-out ignoring my wishes on things that involve myself or the children. For example, my mother had my daughter baptised, and I don't really care that she did, but more that she did it and made a huge fuss that it had to be done 'in secret'. (It didn't, why should I care who pours water on a baby's head, y'lknow?) Also, it was assumed by everyone but me I'd want a church wedding rather than a Quaker wedding because my husband had been going to his church all his life, and I'd, "only been attending Meeting for a little while, right?" Grrr....

It drives me crazy to constantly having to be explaining things, too. I've finally started dealing with questions like, "Why don't you believe in Jesus? Why don't you take communion? Why don't you have a pastor?" by asking the inverse back. Yet when I do ask, "Why do you believe in Jesus? Why do you take communion? Why do you have a pastor?" people get all huffy, or say, "Well, that's what I believe." Erm... duh? I'll also try, "I doubt anyone wants to discuss religious education at a party, you know?" That works pretty well when I don't know a lot of people there.

When will my family stop thinking "It's a phase?" Never? When the children start calling Grandmom 'thee?' When I show up in a funny hat and non-buckled shoes*? Next Tuesday?

Tell me, someone, how you've dealt with the condencesion of a family that thinks you're not 'taking it seriously' because you're not taking their religion to heart!

*Not actually Quaker things, but everyone thinks so.
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Family [Jun. 23rd, 2005|09:53 pm]
Converts United

kibbles
I too was raised Roman Catholic. What else can you be in Brooklyn, when your family is Italian?

But I converted to Quakerism, with the full support of my family. My family even donates clothes to the Meeting and drives me there when I need a ride, and once my brother helped out when we had our Community Dinner.

My mom is just glad I'm doing SOMETHING, (so was her mom, I think), and my dad sees that we're pretty practical and DO stuff and is rather dissatisfied with the Catholic Church anyways.

Plus I found out recently my mom's uncle had converted, and I know my dad's mom was originally Anglican, so I guess my family wasn't as hard core Catholic as I thought.
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Parental/Family Issues [Jun. 23rd, 2005|08:36 pm]
Converts United

zeriel
I suppose the part of conversion I'm best qualified to speak to is the problems of parents and family.

I was raised strictly Roman Catholic--my parents, while definitely of a progressive bent in some ways, are devout, as is my brother. The rest of my family is a hodgepodge of Roman Catholic, Greek Orthodox Catholic, Methodist, and athiest.

I'm one of three prominent converts in my family (my father, who converted from Methodism to marry my Catholic mother, my cousin who converted to some flavor of Judaism for her dickheadhusband, and myself. I'm currently on a spiritual journey that's led me through Judaism (in multiple flavors) to my current fixation on Zen/Buddhism, which is serving me pretty well (Aside from the lack of fellow participants).

I suppose I'd like more than anything to spark a discussion about issues we converts face with our families--in my example, my dad is pretty cool with it as long as I'm not going around being an anarchist or whatever, but my mom and brother are both wholeheartedly convinced that I'm in a phase (that's lasted 7+ years at this point) and I'll return to the "obvious" choice of One True Religion (Catholicism, natch) when the Spirit moves me. That's hard sometimes, but fortunately my relationship with both of them has moved from open confrontation to at least a semi-intelligent discussion of the issues of religion and belief.

Any thoughts? Share your stories!
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